Created Date Tuesday, 01 December 2015

Beledweyne: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

altThe results of the assessment indicate that a sizeable minority of respondents were aware of conflict in the area over the past year.  Further to this, more than one in ten respondents in the household survey stated that they had witnessed conflict between clans or groups in the past year.  A similar proportion of respondents had also witnessed incidents of crime or violence during this time.  Overall, respondents expressed concern about the level of safety in the area, with more than one-quarter of the respondents indicating that they feel unsafe.  Nonetheless, the majority stated that they felt safe and most also had a positive perception of the change in the level of safety in the district in the year leading up to the assessment.  A local government structure was in place and both formal and informal systems of security and justice were operational in Beledweyne.  However, based on the feedback from respondents, the informal systems (Elders and Religious Leaders) were more highly regarded, both collectively and individually.  There was also notable room for improvement in respondents’ trust and confidence in the formal entities.

Created Date Tuesday, 01 December 2015

Borama: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

altOverall, the majority of respondents in the district of Borama indicated that they felt safe in the area.  Most respondents were also of the opinion that safety had improved over the past year.  There were, however, accounts of conflicts and incidents of crime and violence that had been witnessed during this time.  Competition over resources, clashes among the youth, and family disputes were identified as the leading causes of conflict and violence in the area.  Borama had a local council and formal systems of justice and security in place.  However, while the majority expressed trust or confidence in these institutions, a sizeable minority also stated the opposite.  Traditional entities, primarily elders and religious leaders, were highly regarded and influenced perception towards these state institutions.  Generally, most respondents declared that it was important to have elected representatives although several arguments were presented in favour of the nomination system, which was previously utilised. Criticisms were also levelled against the police and the formal justice system.  Nonetheless, the police was identified as the leading choice for responding to crime and violence whereas the formal justice system and elders were jointly regarded as the most trusted entity for dealing with matters pertaining to justice. 

Created Date Tuesday, 01 December 2015

Las Anod: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

altAlthough regarded as one of the most unstable regions in Somaliland, the findings from the 2015 Las Anod DSCA suggest that the district was relatively peaceful in recent times. There were few reported incidents of conflict or violence in the year leading up to the assessment despite the geopolitical instability resulting from various entities (Somaliland, Puntland and the Khatumo State) claiming territorial ownership.  There was an established local council, which operated in accordance with the Regions and Districts Law of Somaliland, as well as formal structures in place for the provision of services to the community, including security and justice.  However, while the formal institutions were generally well recognised, traditional (informal) entities - elders and religious leaders - remained integral within the society.  Notably, the results from the assessment indicate that these informal entities were collectively more trusted than the police and the courts to address matters pertaining to security and justice respectively.  In addition, although the majority of respondents perceived that there had been an improvement in the performance of the various local government institutions over the past year, reported levels of trust or confidence towards the Local Council and the police, in particular, were reported to be low.  Nevertheless, in keeping with the reported experiences, there was a positive outlook regarding the level of safety in the community, with most respondents stating that they felt safe within the area.

Created Date Tuesday, 01 December 2015

Erigavo: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

altOverall, the findings from the assessment indicate that the district of Erigavo was regarded as being relatively peaceful, especially considering its heterogeneous clan composition and proximity to disputed areas such as the Sool region and Eastern Sanaag (Sanaag Barri). There was an established local council and formal structures in place for the provision of services to the community, including security and justice.  However, the traditional leaders - community elders and religious leaders - remained integral to the community and were often consulted regarding matters of conflict or dispute resolution and justice in general.  While there had been no reports of major conflict within the area during the year preceding the assessment, approximately one in ten respondents reported that they had witnessed incidences of conflict during this time.  During the period leading up to the assessment, competition over resources was identified as the main reason for conflict within the area. The majority of respondents reported feeling fairly safe or very safe; however, a sizeable minority was less optimistic.  Notably, the perception of safety appeared to be largely influenced by respondents’ location within the district, with clear variations in the perception of safety and how safety had evolved over the past year among respondents in the various subdivisions. 

Created Date Sunday, 06 September 2015

Baidoa: Key Findings from the July 2015 DCSA Report

altThere was widespread awareness of the formal systems of governance, security and justice in Baidoa.  However, traditional systems still played in fundamental role in these areas.  Elders and religious leaders were especially highly regarded in the areas of justice provision and conflict resolution. Moreover, the structure of the local government was dependent on the traditional system as representatives were appointed based on clan quotas and not elected.  However, there was strong belief in the importance of having elected officials on the premise that this would encourage greater participation of the local community and serve to improve transparency.  In addition, it was thought that elections would result in more qualified candidates.
While a small majority indicated that they felt safe in the area, several concerns were raised regarding the prevalence of crime and violence, which was largely attributed to the presence of armed groups and militia.  This was thought to be exacerbated by the involvement of youth who were propelled into this type of activity due to poor economic conditions and lack of employment opportunities.

The police received precedence as the legitimate provider of security, but was criticised for being unresponsive at times.  They, however received strong support towards stabilising the state of security in the area from entities such as the Somali National Army, the National Intelligence Security Agency and AMISOM as well as local committees and members of the community.

Created Date Sunday, 06 September 2015
Modified Date Sunday, 06 September 2015

Baligubadle: Key Findings from the July 2015 DCSA Report

altDuring the year leading up to assessment, Baligubadle was generally regarded as being very safe.  Less than one in ten household survey participants reported witnessing any incident of conflict or violence during this time.  There was widespread awareness of the formal governance, security and justice systems.  However, traditional systems continued to play a leadership role and provide services to the community, including services in the areas of security and justice provision. Notably, however, there was little mention of religious leaders and elders proved to be the informal entity that residents relied on most.  Nonetheless, the formal institutions were generally more highly regarded and overall, the majority of respondents expressed high levels of trust in the formal systems that were assessed.  In addition, most respondents perceived that there had been an improvement in the performance of each of these entities when compared with the previous year.

Created Date Sunday, 12 July 2015

Hobyo: Key Findings from the June 2015 DCSA Report

altThe results of the assessment indicate that there had been a downturn in conflict in the district of Hobyo following decades of unrest. However, violence and crime were fairly common features of everyday life. In 2008, a new administration called Himan and Heeb, assumed control of the district. Under this administration, Hobyo has a locally nominated council comprised of 23 members (four of whom are female).  Positions are distributed on the basis of the clan composition of the district.  In addition to the structure of the local government, the significance of the traditional clan-based and religious systems was evident in local security and justice provision. The police were notably absent from the district, with state appointed soldiers and informal entities taking the lead in addressing matters of security.  Similarly, there was no formal state-run court. Instead, there was strong reliance on the Islamic court as well as elders and religious leaders for dispute resolution.  Nonetheless, respondents declared a high level of confidence and trust in the existing systems that were in place in the district.  Most persons also reported that they felt safe in the area.

Created Date Sunday, 12 July 2015

Burao: Key Findings from the June 2015 DCSA Report

altIn overall, residents in Burao had little experience with major incidents of crime and violence in recent times.  There was significant awareness of the formal governance, security and justice systems among respondents.  However, traditional systems continued to play a role in these areas.  In the case of governance, representatives were elected based on clan and therefore meant that respective clans still held considerable influence in related matters.  Additionally, traditional leaders were often consulted regarding matters of justice and even more trusted than the courts.  Security provision was the only area in which the formal system was clearly dominant, with the police being regarded as the most trusted entity to respond to various security issues.  Even so, respondents felt that the police force was not adequate to meet the needs of the local population and, in addition to the traditional systems, found alternative means of obtaining security through the engagement of private security guards.

Created Date Tuesday, 02 June 2015

Adaado: Key Findings from the April 2015 DCSA Report

altThe local council in Adaado was commended for its efforts at transparent and consultative governance.  Avenues were put in place to obtain feedback from community stakeholders and to achieve consensus regarding matters of importance to the community.  In addition to the affairs of the district, Adaado, as capital of the Himan and Heeb Administration, was also focused on facilitating negotiations towards the formation of a new federal state.  Plans were underway to bring together all stakeholders for a conference in the district in order to explore the way forward with respect to reconciliation and state formation.  It was believed that recognition as a federal state would have a positive impact on state-building and governance.  However, this also presented some challenges due to the fears, misconceptions, and assumptions held by residents.

Created Date Monday, 01 June 2015

Gardo: Key Findings from the April 2015 DCSA Report

altOverall, the results from the assessment indicate that the formal systems of security, justice, and local governance in Gardo were operational and duly recognised by the local population.  However, the traditional system continued to play a key role and was noted to be very respected within the community. Although subject to the approval of the government, traditional leaders were responsible for the nomination of local council members.  They were also heavily relied on for matters pertaining to justice.